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Gareth Russell’s “Young and Damned and Fair”

For centuries, the six wives of Henry VIII have been the cause of obsessive speculation and endless research. These six women, Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr have played the parts that history has assigned them.

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A Queen Discarded: Alison Weir’s “Katherine of Aragon”

Catalina de Aragon is a fresh-faced, bright-eyed Spanish beauty who comes to the strange land of England to wed Arthur, Prince of Wales. The demure Spanish princess who thereafter is referred to as Katherine (in the English style) arrives in her new country amid great pomp and revelry.

5 Crowns · Book Reviews · Historical Fiction · Historical Fiction - 16th Century · Home · Royal Reviews

The Sixth Wife: Philippa Gregory’s “The Taming of the Queen”

The thirty-one-year-old Kateryn Parr is recently the widow of John Neville, 3rd Baron Latimer and she has come to the royal court. While there, she happens to catch the eye of the rather old and ailing corpulent King Henry VIII, who is determined to have her.

Book Reviews · Historical Fiction · Historical Fiction - 16th Century · Home · Royal Reviews

Navigating the Labyrinth: Martin Lake’s “A Love Most Dangerous”

The year is 1537 and it is Merrie Olde England. The reigning monarch of the day is King Henry VIII, the son of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, perhaps England’s most arguably controversial ruler.